Monday, December 6, 2010

Dungeoneers for Rosetta@home. Because sometimes a Cure Disease spell just doesn't cut it.

“Rosetta@home needs your help to determine the 3-dimensional shapes of proteins in research that may ultimately lead to finding cures for some major human diseases. By running the Rosetta program on your computer while you don't need it you will help us speed up and extend our research in ways we couldn't possibly attempt without your help. You will also be helping our efforts at designing new proteins to fight diseases such as HIV, Malaria, Cancer, and Alzheimer’s... Rosetta@home is not for profit."

I’ve set up a team at Rosetta@home called “OSR Dungeoneers” - If you’d like to join me in donating your computer’s spare CPU cycles, please download BOINC, add the Rosetta@home project (and join the team if you’d like to collaborate and track the team’s progress). BOINC runs on Windows, Intel OS X, and Linux. If you prefer, you can easily adjust the settings so the program only runs when your computer is idle.

Updated 12-9-2010:
I changed the team name to just "Dungeoneers" - I don't want to alienate anyone from a good cause like this over something as silly as a label like "OSR".

Updated 12-20-2010:
Please note that Rosetta@home has largely discontinued support for PowerPC CPUs, so don't bother signing up if you're running an older Mac with a G3, G4, or G5 processor...

Also: If you're a linux user, you may want to install using the downloadable shell script from the main BOINC website rather than using a software manager like Synaptic Package Manager. Depending on your repositories, an older version may not work properly, whereas the shell script will provide you with the latest version.

12 comments:

Il Male™ said...

I'm with you buddy!

ze bulette said...

Cool! I figure it's a great way to contribute to a good cause at little or no cost, esp. for those of us having to watch our spending more closely lately.

Il Male™ said...

Installed yesterday night and had a cool surprise: you can run BOINC as your screensaver, that is to say that the application will be run while you are not using you pc/ppc/whatever. This is very cool to me.

mikemonaco said...

Thanks for mentioning this! I think I heard about it on NPR or something once and promptly forgot all about it. I plan to run it at home and come to think of it, there are dozens of computers at work that our Tech guys insist must stay on 24/7 incase hey need to update security. Maybe they'll agree to run this while the library is closed.

ze bulette said...

Cool - I was thinking the same thing, (as the tech guy) that I'd approach some of my clients to see if they wanted to participate.

biopunk said...

I'm in.

Maybe post a link in the sidebar somewhere?

biopunk said...

Whoops!

Apologies, I just saw it.

ze bulette said...

Hey, great to see someone else on board!

AD&D Grognard said...

I'm curious what the monthly bandwidth requirement is. I'm on a capped bandwidth but if the bandwidth isn't excessive I will set up a box just for that. I gotta a stack of older Dells just sitting here. :)

ze bulette said...

@ADDGrognard: That's a great question. I'm looking into it further but I think it's really minimal - small files of data and downloaded, crunched for hours, and the results are uploaded. There are ways to adjust how often the data is exchanged also. Do you have access to an ISP provided meter of some kind? Maybe you could run it on the fastest machine and compare the bandwidth usage the next day, or install your own meter. I'll update the main post here shortly when I have more info.

ze bulette said...

I'll be installing this bandwith meter on an XP box here and posting my findings shortly.

ze bulette said...

Ok, I obviously never got around to that. Mac users interested in a bandwidth usage meter might look here: http://www.skoobysoft.com/utilities/utilities.html ... I think it's criminal that Canadian ISPs are so into this metered crap.

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