Saturday, January 15, 2011

The Cook: A Gonzo Class by John Anon

A couple summers back I purchased a large D&D collection I’d found via Craigslist. I spent a few hundred bucks on it but it turned out to be quite a score - probably the best items were the Tradervale, and a Tegel Manor. Some of the collection I sold on eBay and elsewhere to recover the initial cost.

The previous owner had also included many of his own campaign materials and though I quickly looked through them, they weren't that interesting to me at the time. So they went into a corner of my office where they've been gathering dust. Last week I took them out again, and found a copy of The Living Greyhawk Journal with a very nice pull out map of the city of Greyhawk.

Then, between some character sheets, I found a stapled version of a class he’d typed up and entitled “The Cook”, complete with level progression, weapon and armor restrictions, and a host of magic spells he refers to as “recipes”. There’s reference to mana on the bottom of the first page which I don’t fully grok - is this a class for GURPS? I’ve never played it - the only game I’ve played with mana is Galloway’s HLFW.

It’s pretty silly stuff - check out that spell list! I’d credit him here but no longer remember his full name (it was John something - a veterinarian who lived on the Oregon coast). So for your edification and amusement, I present John Anon’s “The Cook Class”...
The Cook Class

8 comments:

BigFella said...

Delicious!

christian said...

Oh man, that's so rad. I love using the Pizza spell as a shield or thrown weapon or shield. Too funny!

John L. Williams said...

I just imagine a game of fantasy classed office workers fighting epic battles against fantasy classed restaurant workers. It will be called Stationary & Sauce Pans.

Loquacious said...

Can opener! A true classic need... this is really cool.

Arkhein said...

I'll never watch Iron Chef the same way again.

- Ark

Doo said...

Crazy stuff haha :) really interesting though!

Adrian said...

It looks like the character's mana is calculated based on their ability scores, and then there is a mana cost for each recipe. Grafted on new magic system to D&D perhaps? Although if that is the case, I'm curious why there are recipe levels. It seems mana cost should do enough for balance.

All in all pretty awesome. Thanks for sharing.

Clovis Cithog said...

that game designer is an unrecognized genius;
hopefully, he will show up at a mini-con
with a splattbook or PDF file

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