Friday, April 15, 2011

A Phroaig and a Bigfoot

A few words on two beverages this evening...

First up: Laphroaig. A scotch - I’ve had it before, but it’s been some time and I only considered it again after reading Barad the Gnome’s recent write up. So I had this at Izakaya Meiji Company a couple days ago, and as soon as it touched the table, I immediately remembered it as one of the most smoky, peaty scotches I've ever had. My wife recoiled from the table in horror, and I began to have second thoughts. I drank the first half neat and then added just a dash of water for the second half. That opened it up nicely, but caused my wife to reel backwards again. I briefly thought my eyes might start watering, but maintained composure in the lady's presence.

For the uninitiated or non-scotch drinker, I would say that this one might cause the weak-kneed to become faint or nauseous. Not to say it's bad - far from it. It's just got a lot going on and advertises it in its bouquet without shame. Definitely your grandfather's dad's scotch, briefly evoking the memory of dangerous chemicals in a run down shed, perhaps stored in a rusting, metal container and daring you to bravely (and deeply) inhale the spirit within. I should add, with much better consequences.

Next up: Sierra Nevada’s 2011 Bigfoot Ale (a barleywine). Two words: Blew it. Or, in one word: Burnt. I’ve been drinking these for some years now, and never really been too much of a fan, but I do partake of a single Bigfoot every year to see what’s what at the big SN. Sorry, this year, it’s a big “Don’t buy.” Maybe I just got a bad batch, but I doubt it.

I drank the missing links too.

Incidentally fellow beer snobs, did you know that apparently people will pay (beer) money for your old beer bottlecaps? Yep. I've got a good 350+ different caps here from the last few years. Pacific Northwest and all... Seems almost a shame that the best ones don't bother to put anything distinctive on their caps. On a barely related note, please customize your new "Print Friendly" buttons! It's like someone went on a tagging spree and puked green gobs all over yer blogs. Eesh.

9 comments:

Spawn of Endra said...

Wow, harsh reception for Laphroaig. Did you drink the usual 10-year or the "Quarter Cask" version that Barad was drinking? I haven't tried the latter. I have memories of the smell of peat fires in Ireland from my youth, so I don't think of grandfather's chemical sheds when I smell Laphroaig. Perhaps I'm lucky?

I think I read that during Prohibition Laphroaig could still be imported to and sold in the US because of its alleged medicinal properties. It was viewed as a patent medicine, I guess because it tasted so crazy it had to be good for you.

James said...

Sorry, I tried a less green button but blogger didn't like it!

Joseph Browning said...

Laphroaig's my favorite scotch. It's like drinking a peat fire - in a good way. :)

Telecanter said...

Yeah, the other button options give xml errors. I emailed the support but they never gave me a solution.

ze bulette said...

@Spawn: I actually really like it, as I said, it's far from bad - just not for the neophyte. I had the ten year here. I'd be happy to get together and compare notes at Izakaya's (since you're in Eugene) if you're ever inclined.

@James & Telecanter: Is my little red button working for you on this page? I haven't gotten any errors with it here in Firefox.

C'nor (Outermost_Toe) said...

Error #109854295:

Matrix connection lost.

(In other words, there is no button.)

Also, "There is no bull in bulette. ~ zb" - What if it eats one?

Jamie Albrecht said...

Laphroaig is the first drink that's ever made me understand bouquets. I got a bottle of the 10 year for my dad's birthday and when I read the label, I thought it was full of it. Needless to say, when I eventually tried it and it did in fact taste like everything it was described as tasting like (including that thick, smoky peat), I was promptly convinced.

ze bulette said...

@C'nor: Look Harder! But re: bull, touché!

Barad the Gnome said...

Funny about the recoiling, my wife does that with just about any scotch have in a glass. I'll remember to keep the Laphroaig further away.

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